Subscribe
Categories
  • 409A
  • COBRA
  • Commentary/Opinions/Views
  • Deferred Compensation
  • Employment Agreements
  • Equity Compensation
  • ERISA Litigation
  • Executive Compensation
  • Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA)
  • Fiduciary Issues
  • Fringe Benefits
  • General
  • Governmental Plans
  • Health Care Reform
  • Health Plans
  • International Issues
  • International Pension and Benefits
  • Legal Updates
  • Multi-employer Plans
  • Non-qualified Retirement Plans
  • On the Lighter Side
  • Plan Administration and Compliance
  • Qualified Plans
  • Securities Law Implications
  • Severance Agreements
  • Tax-qualified Retirement Plans
  • Uncategorized
  • Welfare Plans
  • Archives
  • November 2017
  • October 2017
  • September 2017
  • August 2017
  • July 2017
  • June 2017
  • May 2017
  • April 2017
  • March 2017
  • February 2017
  • January 2017
  • December 2016
  • November 2016
  • October 2016
  • September 2016
  • August 2016
  • July 2016
  • June 2016
  • May 2016
  • April 2016
  • March 2016
  • February 2016
  • January 2016
  • December 2015
  • November 2015
  • October 2015
  • September 2015
  • August 2015
  • July 2015
  • June 2015
  • May 2015
  • April 2015
  • March 2015
  • February 2015
  • January 2015
  • December 2014
  • November 2014
  • October 2014
  • September 2014
  • August 2014
  • July 2014
  • June 2014
  • May 2014
  • April 2014
  • March 2014
  • February 2014
  • January 2014
  • December 2013
  • November 2013
  • October 2013
  • September 2013
  • August 2013
  • July 2013
  • June 2013
  • May 2013
  • April 2013
  • March 2013
  • February 2013
  • January 2013
  • December 2012
  • November 2012
  • October 2012
  • September 2012
  • August 2012
  • July 2012
  • June 2012
  • May 2012
  • April 2012
  • March 2012
  • February 2012
  • January 2012
  • December 2011
  • November 2011
  • October 2011
  • September 2011
  • August 2011
  • BC Network
    LATEST POST
    Thursday, November 9, 2017

    Last week the House unveiled its tax overhaul plan, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (“Act”).  The Act’s proposals related to employee benefits and compensation are as follows:

    Nonqualified Deferred Compensation

    Perhaps one of the most talked about aspects of the Act (at least among benefits practitioners) is the demise of Code section 409A and the creation of its replacement, Code section 409B.

    Under the proposed Code section 409B regime, nonqualified deferred compensation would be defined broadly to include any compensation that could be paid later than the March 15 following the taxable year in which the compensation is no longer subject to a substantial risk of forfeiture, but with specific carve-outs for qualified retirement plans and bona fide vacation, leave, disability, or death benefit plans.  Stock options, stock appreciation rights, restricted stock units, and other phantom equity are included expressly in the definition of nonqualified deferred compensation.

    All nonqualified deferred compensation earned for services performed after 2017 would become taxable once the substantial risk of forfeiture no longer exists, even if payment of the compensation occurs in a later tax year.  As a result:

    • Stock options and stock appreciation rights would become includible in income in the year in which the award vests, without regard to whether they have been exercised.
    • An employee’s deferral of any salary under a nonqualified deferred compensation arrangement until separation from service or otherwise would result in the inclusion of such amount in the employee’s income in the year earned.
    • All salary continuation payments under a severance arrangement would be taxable in the year in which the termination of employment occurs.

    Further, a substantial risk of forfeiture exists only so long as the compensation remains subject to the service provider’s continued substantial future services.  The satisfaction of performance conditions would no longer qualify as a substantial risk of forfeiture.

    All nonqualified deferred compensation earned for services performed before 2018, to the extent not previously includible in income, will be included in income in the last tax year beginning before 2026 or, if later, the date the substantial risk of forfeiture with respect to such compensation no longer exists.  A limited period of time would be provided during which such nonqualified deferred compensation may be amended to conform the date of distribution to the date such amount would be required to be included in the participant’s income without violating Code section 409A.

    Performance-Based Compensation

    The Act also would eliminate the exception to the Code section 162(m) limit on deductible compensation for performance-based compensation, effective January 1, 2018.  The definition of a “covered employee” for purposes of application of Code section 162(m) would change to include an employee who is the principal executive officer or principal financial officer at any time during the taxable year or one of the top three highest-paid employees (or who has ever been a covered employee after 2016).

    Since satisfaction of the specified performance targets would no longer constitute a substantial risk of forfeiture, an employee who participates in a long-term incentive plan that does not require continued employment through the end of the performance period as a condition to receiving the bonus (or the Company subsequently waives such requirement) would be required to include the bonus amount in income in the year in which no additional services are required (even if the final performance results are unknown).

    Beginning in 2018, tax-exempt organizations would become subject to a 20% excise tax on all compensation (cash and the cash value of all remuneration, including benefits paid in a medium other than cash, except for payments to a qualified retirement plan and amounts that are excludable from the employee’s gross income) in excess of $1 million paid to the five highest-paid employees.

    Retirement Plans

    Many of the proposed changes for qualified plans would be favorable for participants.

    Hardship distributions would no longer require participants to cease making contributions during the six-month period after the distribution.  In addition, a defined contribution plan could permit participants to receive a distribution from qualified nonelective contributions (QNECs), qualified matching contributions (QMACs), profit sharing contributions and earnings on any such contributions.  In addition, participants would no longer be required to seek any available plan loan first to alleviate their financial need.

    The minimum age at which a defined benefit pension plan could permit commencement of in-service benefits or a state and local government defined contribution plan could permit an in-service distribution is reduced from age 62 to age 59 ½.

    A participant would have until the due date for filing his or her tax return to roll over a loan balance from a qualified plan to an individual retirement account (IRA), instead of the current 60 day period, before such amount is treated as a distribution.

    Miscellaneous and Fringe Benefits

    Effective January 1, 2018, the following benefits would become taxable to the employee:

    • Reimbursed dependent care expenses under a dependent care assistance program (DCAP) and employer-provided onsite daycare
    • Qualified tuition reimbursement plan benefits
    • Adoption assistance plan benefits
    • Qualified moving-expense reimbursements
    • Employee achievement awards given in recognition of length of service or safety achievement
    • Employer contributions to an Archer Medical Savings Account (accounts could not be established after 2005). Such contributions also would be non-deductible by the employer.

    Transportation fringe benefits would continue to be excludible from employees’ income, but an employer would no longer be entitled to a deduction.

    As expected, the House is engaged in intense negotiations on various parts of the Act so the extent to which any of these provisions will remain in their current iteration in the final version is yet to been determined.

    For more information on the Act’s proposals related to estate transfer taxes, read the Trust Bryan Cave blog’s summary of the Act.

    RECENT POSTS
    Tuesday, October 31, 2017

    New rules issued by the Trump administration, including both interim final and temporary regulations effective October 6, 2017, significantly expand “who” may object to the Patient Protection and Affordable Coverage Act’s (PPACA) contraceptive coverage mandate and why those entities or […]

    Thursday, October 19, 2017

    The Internal Revenue Service today released the 2018 dollar limits for retirement plans, as adjusted under Code Section 415(d). We have summarized the new limits (along with the limits from the last few years) in the chart below. *For taxable years […]

    Tuesday, September 19, 2017

    Securities and executive benefits attorneys and public companies that maintain equity incentive plans should be aware of a new theory of recovery under the “short-swing profit rule.” Plaintiffs’ attorneys have recently asserted a new form of claim alleging liability under […]

    Thursday, September 14, 2017

    Employers seeking ways to help employees and their family members affected by Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, or Maria should consider the various relief made available by the Internal Revenue Service under Announcements 2017-11 and 2017-13 and Notice 2017-48. Under Notice 2017-48, […]

    Tuesday, August 8, 2017

    According to one recent survey, telemedicine services (i.e., remote delivery of healthcare services using telecommunications technology) among large employers (500 or more employees) grew from 18% in 2014 to 59% in 2016.  Common selling points touted by telemedicine vendors include […]

    Friday, July 28, 2017

    Are you gearing up for open enrollment’s alphabet soup? Anyone who works in human resources/employee benefits and has survived even one open enrollment season knows just how busy that alphabet soup will make your next few months. Before open enrollment […]

    Wednesday, July 19, 2017

    Update: On October 12, 2017, the Department of Labor issued a proposed rule to delay the applicability date of new disability claims procedures regulation for 90 days until April 1, 2018. Plan sponsors are typically forced to wait for last […]

    Tuesday, June 6, 2017

    The Department of Labor has issued guidance in the form of Frequently Asked Questions to help firms and their advisers impacted by the Fiduciary Rule know what is expected on and after June 9, 2017, on and after January 1, 2018, […]

    Wednesday, May 10, 2017

    Originally posted on BankBryanCave.com. Employee Stock Ownership Plans offer an opportunity for banks to offer an attractive employee benefit plan, but can also do so much more.  On the latest episode of The Bank Account, Jonathan and I are joined […]