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Wednesday, April 11, 2012

In a recent decision, the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals upheld an indemnification of multiemployer plan withdrawal liability in an collective bargaining agreement.

In the case, the employer and labor union had bargained that the union would indemnify the employer for any withdrawal liability from the multiemployer plan. The union, however, subsequently disclaimed its representation of the employees. As a result of that disclaimer, the union was no longer the exclusive bargaining representative of the affected employees and the collective bargaining agreement terminated. As a result, the employer effected a withdrawal from the multiemployer pension to which it had been obligated to contribute and incurred a substantial withdrawal liability.

It so happened that the pension fund in question was the Central States Southeast and Southwest Areas Pension Fund, which is known to have had funding problems for some time. When the pension fund assessed withdrawal liability on the employer, the employer sought indemnification from the union. Upon a challenge on the enforceability of that indemnification provision, the court upheld the provision reasoning that it was analogous to purchasing fiduciary liability insurance, which is expressly permitted under ERISA Section 410.

While this case may be unique on its facts, it may prove helpful to contributing employers to multiemployer pension plans who wish to have the labor union they are negotiating with share some or all of the pain of a withdrawal liability from a multiemployer plan. The holding could also potentially be used to support passing along surcharges or other costs of multiemployer plan participation to the union, assuming the union is willing to agree. Employers entering into union negotiations should consider whether this protection (or something like it) is worth pursuing.

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